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EYFS Curriculum

Kids Academy Childcare preschool education curriculum for children aged 3 years to 6 years is provided by the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

The EYFS Framework is :-

The EYFS is made up of six areas of Learning and Development. All areas of Learning and Development are connected to one another and are equally important. All areas of Learning and Development are underpinned by the principles of the EYFS.

The Six areas of Learning and Development are:

1. Personal, Social and Emotional Development
2. Communication, Language and Literacy
3. Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy
4. Knowledge and Understanding of the World
5. Physical Development
6. Creative Development.

1. Personal, Social and Emotional Development

Requirements

Children must be provided with experiences and support which will help them to develop a positive sense of themselves and of others; respect for others; social skills; and a positive disposition to learn. Providers must ensure support for children’s emotional well-being to help them to know themselves and what they can do.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development is made up of the following aspects

Dispositions and Attitudes - is about how children become interested, excited and motivated about their learning.
Self-confidence and Self-esteem - is about children having a sense of their own value and understanding the need for sensitivity to significant events in their own and other people’s lives.
Making Relationships - is about the importance of children forming good relationships with others and working alongside others companionably.
Behaviour and Self-control - is about how children develop a growing understanding of what is right and wrong and why, together with learning about the impact of their words and actions on themselves and others.
Self-care - is about how children gain a sense of self-respect and concern for their own personal hygiene and care and how they develop independence.
Sense of Community - is about how children understand and respect their own needs, views, cultures and beliefs and those of other people.

2. Communication, Language and Literacy

Requirements

Children’s learning and competence in communicating, speaking and listening, being read to and beginning to read and write must be supported and extended. They must be provided with opportunity and encouragement to use their skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes, and be supported in developing the confidence and disposition to do so.

Communication, Language and Literacy is made up of the following aspects:

Language for Communication - is about how children become communicators. Learning to listen and speak emerges out of non-verbal communication, which includes facial expression, eye contact and hand gesture. These skills develop as children interact with others, listen to and use language, extend their vocabulary and experience stories, songs, poems and rhymes.

Language for Thinking - is about how children learn to use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences and how they use talk to clarify their thinking and ideas or to refer to events they have observed or are curious about.

Linking Sounds and Letters - is about how children develop the ability to distinguish between sounds and become familiar with rhyme, rhythm and alliteration. They develop understanding of the correspondence between spoken and written sounds and learn to link sounds and letters and use their knowledge to read and write simple words by sounding out and blending.

Reading - is about children understanding and enjoying stories, books and rhymes, recognising that print carries meaning, both fiction and fact, and reading a range of familiar words and simple sentences.

Writing - is about how children build an understanding of the relationship between the spoken and written word and how through making marks, drawing and personal writing children ascribe meaning to text and attempt to write for various purposes.

Handwriting - is about the ways in which children’s random marks, lines and drawings develop and form the basis of recognisable letters.

3. Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy

Requirements

Children must be supported in developing their understanding of Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy in a broad range of contexts in which they can explore, enjoy, learn, practise and talk about their developing understanding. They must be provided with opportunities to practise and extend their skills in these areas and to gain confidence and competence in their use.

Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy is made up of the following aspects:

Numbers as Labels and for Counting - is about how children gradually know and use numbers and counting in play, and eventually recognise and use numbers reliably, to develop mathematical ideas and to solve problems.
Calculating - is about how children develop an awareness of the relationship between numbers and amounts and know that numbers can be combined to be ‘added together’ and can be separated by ‘taking away’ and that two or more amounts can be compared.
Shape, Space and Measures - is about how through talking about shapes and quantities, and developing appropriate vocabulary, children use their knowledge to develop ideas and to solve mathematical problems.

4. Knowledge and Understanding of the World

Requirements

Children must be supported in developing the knowledge, skills and understanding that help them to make sense of the world. Their learning must be supported through offering opportunities for them to use a range of tools safely; encounter creatures, people, plants and objects in their natural environments and in real-life situations; undertake practical ‘experiments’; and work with a range of materials.

Knowledge and Understanding of the World is made up of the following aspects:

Exploration and Investigation - is about how children investigate objects and materials and their properties, learn about change and patterns, similarities and differences, and question how and why things work.
Designing and Making - is about the ways in which children learn about the construction process and the tools and techniques that can be used to assemble materials creatively and safely.
ICT - is about how children find out about and learn how to use appropriate information technology such as computers and programmable toys that support their learning.
Time - is about how children find out about past and present events relevant to their own lives or those of their families.
Place - is about how children become aware of and interested in the natural world, and find out about their local area, knowing what they like and dislike about it.
Communities - is about how children begin to know about their own and other people’s cultures in order to understand and celebrate the similarities and differences between them in a diverse society.

5. Physical Development

Requirements

The physical development of babies and young children must be encouraged through the provision of opportunities for them to be active and interactive and to improve their skills of coordination, control, manipulation and movement.

They must be supported in using all of their senses to learn about the world around them and to make connections between new information and what they already know. They must be supported in developing an understanding of the importance of physical activity and making healthy choices in relation to food.

Physical Development is made up of the following aspects:

Movement and Space - is about how children learn to move with confidence, imagination and safety, with an awareness of space, themselves and others.
Health and Bodily Awareness - is about how children learn the importance of keeping healthy and the factors that contribute to maintaining their health.
Using Equipment and Materials - is about the ways in which children use a range of small and large equipment.

6. Creative Development

Requirements

Children’s creativity must be extended by the provision of support for their curiosity, exploration and play. They must be provided with opportunities to explore and share their thoughts, ideas and feelings, for example, through a variety of art, music, movement, dance, imaginative and role-play activities, mathematics, and design and technology.

Creative Development is made up of the following aspects:

Being Creative - Responding to Experiences, Expressing and Communicating Ideas - is about how children respond in a variety of ways to what they see, hear, smell, touch or feel and how, as a result of these encounters, they express and communicate their own ideas, thoughts and feelings.

Exploring Media and Materials - is about children’s independent and guided exploration of and engagement with a widening range of media and materials, finding out about, thinking about and working with colour, texture, shape, space and form in two and three dimensions.

Creating Music and Dance - is about children’s independent and guided explorations of sound, movement and music. Focusing on how sounds can be made and changed and how sounds can be recognised and repeated from a pattern, it includes ways of exploring movement, matching movements to music and singing simple songs from memory.

Developing Imagination and Imaginative Play - is about how children are supported to develop and build their imaginations through stories, role-plays, imaginative play, dance, music, design, and art.